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Be Our Guest

Why does My Hair Trip Salon in Denver have more 5-star online reviews than any other eco-friendly and/or organic salon in Colorado?

Well the #1 thing making My Hair Trip #1 is the way they treat their guests from the owners to the receptionists. While at My Hair Trip Salon in the Denver Art District guests are always greeted with a smile and offered a beverage, purified water, organic coffees and teas, or a cold beer or glass of wine. Friendly conversation mixes in the air with fresh smells of natural health and beauty products as the salon buzzes with positive energy and activity.

Clients are always commenting on how “good it feels” in the shop and the owners say that has always been one of their main focuses. “We want to have a space where, no matter who you are, what’s your style, your personality, no matter what’s going on in your life, you can come here and feel comfortable and be taken care of.” says Paul Zamora, co-owner of My Hair Trip.

My Hair Trip Salon definitely stands out from the crowd of other salons in Denver and indeed in the industry in general, starting from their strict policies on what products they carry and what services they provide there is a genuine sense of family at the shop that is palpable and is a pleasant change of pace from an industry that is typically highly competitive, self-centric, and at times, toxic. My Hair Trip has found a way to work together as a team for common goals as a unit, and it is noticeable in the mood of the shop.

My Hair Trip also uses a personal touch. Our stylists always handle their clients from start to finish. A lot of other salons will have assistants and apprentices wash and style their clients, not at My Hair Trip, our clients are the most important thing and it will always be that way at this revolutionary organic hair salon.

So bottom line is there is a lot going on at My Hair Trip Salon in Denver, Colorado, that is helping them to climb to the top of their industry and it doesn’t look like they’ll be slowing down anytime soon.

You can check them out at 8th and Santa Fe in the Denver Art District.

or at myhairtrip.com

Article written by industry blogger in 2016

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    Phia now available in The Be Good Boutique

    Why do we love Phia? Why do we sell Phia to our clients and customers?

    For the past six years, Phia’s founder has researched the energy of essential oils. Based on this work, it was discovered that this energy is visible, vibrant and long-lasting. In contrast, synthetic ingredients commonly used in commercial products were found to be faint or lifeless. Natural energies impact the way we feel, the way we think and how we live.

    At Phia, they harness energies created by sun, soil and water, found in fields, forests and oceans from the far corners of the world. Products are created with your well-being in mind, deliberately void of synthetic substances that deflate or destroy the vibrant energy of natural essences.

    At Phia, they believe that these vibrant ingredients deserve perfect proportions. In art and science, Phi is the divine proportion. This mysterious form of numeric perfection shapes our world and fulfills our senses. From Egypt’s inspiring pyramids to Da Vinci’s majestic masterpieces to the soothing sound of the violin, Phi empowers creation.

    Phi (Φ), the world’s most perfect number (1.618), is evident in beauty, nature, art, music, architecture, and even the human anatomy. Phia products apply the time tested pattern of Phi to achieve the divine.

    At Phia Lab they want you to be a force. They believe their products can make that happen but they recognize that one force does not fit all. To meet your needs and interests, they developed a proprietary Energy Spectrum to classify essential oils of plants, flowers and herbs according to their energy content.

    Adventure

    Balance

    Confidence

    Grounding

    Focus

    Imagination

    Based on the study of hundreds of oils, the Spectrum contains six energy categories: Adventure, Focus, Balance, Imagination and Confidence. We carefully blend within an energy category using the mathematical formulations of Phi to create unique bouquets with strength and purpose.

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      Davines’ New MINU Line, Collaboration with Presidia Project

      Slow & Steady
      Davines is making major changes this year. It has updated all nine of its Essential Haircare families—they’re produced using energy from renewable sources with Zero Impact packaging and a reduced use of plastic. MINU is a new addition to those families, and it preserves color with its shampoo, conditioner, hair mask and hair serum.

      Additionally, Davines is collaborating with the non-profit Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity by joining the Presidia Project; the non-profit builds bridges between ecology, gastronomy, ethics and good food and supports 10,000 small producers that grow plants typical of specific places.

      Each family of the Essential Haircare line contains a single active ingredient from a Slow Food Presidium and features the story, face and name of the farmer who grew it. The goal is to kick-start smaller economies and prevent extinction of local artisan traditions.

      Article and more found at: http://www.modernsalon.com/news/davines-new-minu-line-collaboration-presidia-project

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        Small Businesses Go Green, Using More Environmentally Friendly Products and Practices

        “Many company owners use environmentally friendly cars, recycle materials and buy biodegradable office supplies because they care about what happens to the environment. It also makes good business sense, making their companies more competitive and lifting employees’ morale.

        W&M Properties, a New York-based real estate company that also has a construction affiliate, has switched its fleet of more than 25 pickup trucks to hybrid Ford Escape cars. President Tony Malkin said of the hybrids, “they pay for themselves in the fuel savings.” He noted that most of the company’s driving is done on local streets, and called the pickups’ mileage “appalling.”

        W&M has also implemented recycling programs in the buildings it manages, including ones that handle discarded computers — “it’s what you’re supposed to do, but people don’t do it,” Malkin said.

        The company also is recycling about half the materials it’s removing from a project being done for Pitney Bowes. “You’re using less landfill space, and it’s product that can be used again in the future,” Malkin said.

        Malkin said his company is using more green practices because “the current way of doing business is destructible.” But, he said, “people want to do business in an environmentally sustainable fashion and we are at a competitive advantage by moving the needle toward green.”

        There are many ways that companies can go green. Some of them are simple, and basic, such as conserving energy with appliances and equipment that aren’t power guzzlers. Recycling is a very common way to go green. So is buying paper and other supplies that are made with recycled material.

        There are plenty of resources detailing how to go green on the Internet, in bookstores and in libraries. Environmental groups have information as well.

        Mark Mandel, co-owner of Mark Drugs, a Roselle, Ill., pharmacy, said his business recycles even though the local government doesn’t have a recycling program.

        “It’s an extra effort, but we feel it’s important to be conscientious about the environment,” he said.

        Mandel said paper from computer printouts is sorted, with blanks pulled out, saved and reused. His company hasn’t needed to buy prescription pads since it started recycling.

        He also finds it’s good for morale. “The staff realizes you are concerned,” he said, and noted that the good feeling generated by his attitude filters down to their interactions with customers.

        “Everyone takes a team attitude,” he said.

        The company plans to construct its own building in the future, and Mandel said it will be a green building.

        Of course, for some companies, their reason for being is green, for example, organic food stores or manufacturers of clothing made from natural fibers only.

        Floorworks, a Toronto-based hardwood flooring manufacturer, sells green products — it says its wood comes from forests that have been approved by the Forest Stewardship Council, a group that aims at managing forests in an environmentally friendly way. Co-founder Brian Greenberg said the company also donates a percentage of its profits toward the replanting of rainforests.

        Greenberg said the company wanted to help fight the deleterious effects of climate change. “One of the problems we can address through the sale of our products is to be involved with reforestation.”

        That kind of activism appeals to many consumers, who are often drawn to the idea that the money they spend can be doing good for the world. But they’re also looking for products and services that are good for them — Greenberg said his company has thrived by selling flooring that isn’t covered with polyurethane, but that’s protected by oil. That stops plastic particles from going into the air, he said.

        The Greenhouse Grille, a Fayetteville, Ark., restaurant, sells organic food and uses as many environmentally friendly products and services as it can find. Clayton Suttle, a co-owner, said he and his partners have eaten organic food for years because of its health benefits, and “when we were looking into opening a restaurant, it just kind of carried over.”

        “We’re trying to go as much so-called green as we can,” he said.

        The partners weren’t sure from the get-go that their concept would work. But organic food has become very popular in their area, and the fact that local organic farmers were selling their meat and produce to the restaurant has helped.”

        From: Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
        Published April 19, 2007 12:00 AM

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