x
How To Clean Hair Brushes & Combs

How To Clean Hair Brushes & Combs
One thing you might not think about cleaning on the regular is your hairbrush or comb. Of course, we remove hair build up every so often but do you take the time to really clean them? The downside is if we don’t clean them on a somewhat regular basis dirt, oil and hair products can build up and leave your hair feeling not so clean. So how do we solve this problem? Well, there is an easy way to clean our your brushes and combs and it only takes a few minutes. Check out the instructions below on how to clean hair brushes and combs:
Start by removing all hair that has built up in between the bristles of your brush or comb. If some hair is woven tightly, use a toothpick to loosen.
Next, soak your tools in a sink of warm water with a few drops of shampoo. This will help remove oils and any product lingering in the bristles. Gentle scrub to get them extra clean.
If you happen to have a wooden, padded, or rubber brush skip the soaking step. Simply run these type of brushes under water with no soap to remove oils and dirt.
That’s all it takes to remove the build up on your brushes and it can be done on a weekly basis to make sure your brush is as clean as possible.

article found at:
http://www.raininghotcoupons.com/clean-hair-brushes-combs/

Show Comments (2)
    x
    Small Businesses Go Green, Using More Environmentally Friendly Products and Practices

    “Many company owners use environmentally friendly cars, recycle materials and buy biodegradable office supplies because they care about what happens to the environment. It also makes good business sense, making their companies more competitive and lifting employees’ morale.

    W&M Properties, a New York-based real estate company that also has a construction affiliate, has switched its fleet of more than 25 pickup trucks to hybrid Ford Escape cars. President Tony Malkin said of the hybrids, “they pay for themselves in the fuel savings.” He noted that most of the company’s driving is done on local streets, and called the pickups’ mileage “appalling.”

    W&M has also implemented recycling programs in the buildings it manages, including ones that handle discarded computers — “it’s what you’re supposed to do, but people don’t do it,” Malkin said.

    The company also is recycling about half the materials it’s removing from a project being done for Pitney Bowes. “You’re using less landfill space, and it’s product that can be used again in the future,” Malkin said.

    Malkin said his company is using more green practices because “the current way of doing business is destructible.” But, he said, “people want to do business in an environmentally sustainable fashion and we are at a competitive advantage by moving the needle toward green.”

    There are many ways that companies can go green. Some of them are simple, and basic, such as conserving energy with appliances and equipment that aren’t power guzzlers. Recycling is a very common way to go green. So is buying paper and other supplies that are made with recycled material.

    There are plenty of resources detailing how to go green on the Internet, in bookstores and in libraries. Environmental groups have information as well.

    Mark Mandel, co-owner of Mark Drugs, a Roselle, Ill., pharmacy, said his business recycles even though the local government doesn’t have a recycling program.

    “It’s an extra effort, but we feel it’s important to be conscientious about the environment,” he said.

    Mandel said paper from computer printouts is sorted, with blanks pulled out, saved and reused. His company hasn’t needed to buy prescription pads since it started recycling.

    He also finds it’s good for morale. “The staff realizes you are concerned,” he said, and noted that the good feeling generated by his attitude filters down to their interactions with customers.

    “Everyone takes a team attitude,” he said.

    The company plans to construct its own building in the future, and Mandel said it will be a green building.

    Of course, for some companies, their reason for being is green, for example, organic food stores or manufacturers of clothing made from natural fibers only.

    Floorworks, a Toronto-based hardwood flooring manufacturer, sells green products — it says its wood comes from forests that have been approved by the Forest Stewardship Council, a group that aims at managing forests in an environmentally friendly way. Co-founder Brian Greenberg said the company also donates a percentage of its profits toward the replanting of rainforests.

    Greenberg said the company wanted to help fight the deleterious effects of climate change. “One of the problems we can address through the sale of our products is to be involved with reforestation.”

    That kind of activism appeals to many consumers, who are often drawn to the idea that the money they spend can be doing good for the world. But they’re also looking for products and services that are good for them — Greenberg said his company has thrived by selling flooring that isn’t covered with polyurethane, but that’s protected by oil. That stops plastic particles from going into the air, he said.

    The Greenhouse Grille, a Fayetteville, Ark., restaurant, sells organic food and uses as many environmentally friendly products and services as it can find. Clayton Suttle, a co-owner, said he and his partners have eaten organic food for years because of its health benefits, and “when we were looking into opening a restaurant, it just kind of carried over.”

    “We’re trying to go as much so-called green as we can,” he said.

    The partners weren’t sure from the get-go that their concept would work. But organic food has become very popular in their area, and the fact that local organic farmers were selling their meat and produce to the restaurant has helped.”

    From: Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
    Published April 19, 2007 12:00 AM

    Leave a reply