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3 Lessons From Jennifer Aniston’s Brazilian Blowout Diaster

Jennifer Aniston chopped off 6 inches of her infamous, honey-hued hair after a mishap with controversial keratin treatment, Brazilian Blowout.

From her iconic “Rachel” layered hairstyle in the TV show, Friends, to today’s soft, a-line bob Jennifer Aniston’s hair is no stranger to the spotlight.

All Keratin Treatments Are Not Created Equal
A whirlwind of controversy has circled treatments such as, Brazilian Blowout as early as 2005. This is due to the inclusion of formaldehyde in their product’s smoothing solution.

In 2011, the National Toxicology Program, an interagency program of the Department of Health and Human Services, named formaldehyde as a known human carcinogen.

There has been additional concern that once the product’s solution is heated near the scalp (necessary for application), formaldehyde can penetrate the scalp and hair follicle, causing irreversible damage to the cells responsible for hair growth.

Meaning, once the hair follicle is damaged, it will have difficulty growing hair, again.

“If Aniston wanted to maintain her enviable lustrous locks, she could have opted for a keratin treatment that is both formaldehyde-free and contains L-cystine, an amino acid that promotes hair growth,” says Organic Salon Systems’ Technical Director, Rebecca Gregory.

Lesson 1: Opt for a keratin treatment that is absent of formaldehyde, and promotes hair health. Ex Keragreen

Heavy Chemical Treatments Can Hurt Hair More Than Help It
“We are constantly up against this battle,” Gregory continues, “people use hair products that give their hair a temporary feeling of health and shine, but in reality, these products are just packed with petrochemicals and plastics that end up causing the hair to be dry and brittle in the long run.”

Celebrity Hair Stylist, Rachel Wood says she’s, “not surprised Jen’s doing the chop. Many [treatments] have chemicals that can damage the hair.”
Lesson 2: Chemically-laden hair products give hair a false feeling of health, and damage strands more in the long run.

Overly Damaged Hair = Necessary Hair Chop
Jennifer Aniston’s Brazilian Blowout-induced haircut reminds us that once hair has been damaged beyond repair, it will need to be trimmed (yes, sometimes that trim can be up to 6+ inches).

If severely damaged hair goes uncut, the hair strands will eventually split completely in half and fall out at the root.

Which brings us to our final lesson:

Lesson 3: Damaged hair will have to be cut in order to prevent hair fall and promote healthy hair growth.

This article and more found at: http://organiccolorsystems.com/jennifer-aniston-brazilian-blowout/

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    Brazilian Blowouts: Toxic Risk?

    “(NBC) – Could the pursuit of perfectly straight hair be hazardous to your health, and your stylist’s?

    Women across the country have been thrilled with their keratin treatments that promise sleek hair even on days with the worst humidity, but now the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration has issued a hazard alert to hair salon owners saying some of these products release high levels of formaldehyde.

    OSHA tests detected the gas in the air even when stylists used products labeled formaldehyde-free.

    The alert specifically mentions the Brazilian Blowout, which does not technically contain formaldehyde.

    But brazilian blowout products have an ingredient called “methylene glycol” which the company’s ceo tells us does release trace amounts of formaldehyde during the heating and straightening process.

    That’s why salon owner Michael Randazzo opted not to use them in his Charlotte, North Carolina salon.

    “There was controversy over the Brazilian Blowout. Does it have formaldehyde, does it not? I’m not going to do a service here that’s not good for us,” he says.

    The potential problem is not limited to the Brazilian Blowout.

    OSHA points out other similar treatments may also release formaldehyde.

    Some New York salons now require their stylists and customers wear gas masks when using the products.

    Formaldehyde can irritate the eyes and cause allergic reactions.

    It’s also linked to lung cancer.

    It’s a potentially hefty price to pay to avoid a few bad hair days.

    The company that sells Brazilian Blowout products also sells “Brazilian Blowout Zero” which does not contain methylene glycol.”

    Not to worry, My Hair Trip Salon, Denver’s eco-friendly, organic hair salon has chemical-free services that can get the same results as the Brazilian blowout without causing harm to clients or stylists. Hooray!

    We found this super informative article at:
    http://www.kvoa.com/news/brazilian-blowouts-toxic-risk-/

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      Brazilian Blowout Hair Straightening Product Contains Dangerous Levels Of Cancer-Causing Formaldehyde

      Those sleek, pin straight locks desired by many girls might come at a higher price than many hair professionals are aware of. The Brazilian Blowout Acai Professional Smoothing Hair Solution, a permanent hair straightening system, was recently discovered to have cancer causing agents in the formula.

      Soon to be published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, the study shows that salon stylist and clients were being exposed to high levels of formaldehyde. Formaldehyde is a colorless, flammable, strong-smelling chemical commonly used in building materials, household products, and in the embalming fluid used to preserve human corpses.

      Study author Michelle Stewart, of the University of California, Berkeley, found that “formaldehyde concentrations in the air around hairstylists and customers exceeded limits set by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health,” as reported by MedicineNet.com.

      Formaldehyde primarily affects the upper respiratory tract. A 1980 laboratory study conducted on rats has shown that a high exposure of formaldehyde could lead to certain cancers, including nasal cancer. Several studies cited by the American Cancer Society have established a link between formaldehyde and cancers of the uppermost part of the throat (nasopharynx). However other studies sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and other organizations are inconclusive.

      Research also points to a connection between formaldehyde exposure and leukemia. “A recent study found that workers exposed to formaldehyde had higher than normal levels of chromosome changes in early white blood cells in their bone marrow,” according to the American Cancer Society. “This finding supports the possible link between formaldehyde exposure and leukemia.”

      Measures have been enacted to reduce workplace exposure to the carcinogen. In 1987, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) mandated that workers exposed to formaldehyde must be limited to an eight-hour work day and that the limit was reduced from 3 ppm (parts per million) to 1 ppm. Five years later, the limitations on formaldehyde exposure became more strict as the amount was further reduced to 0.75 ppm.

      The Brazilian Blowout formula has a higher concentration than what is recommended. “The recommendation is that salons use products containing no more than 0.1 percent formaldehyde, but the product we investigated contained 12 percent formaldehyde,” said Stewart.

      The chemical hair straightening treatment helps girls with curly or wavy hair turn their tresses sleek and straight. The treatment can last up to three months and needs to be redone once the person’s hair starts to grow out. Documented side effects from using the product include water eyes, runny nose, upper respiratory tract infections, and nose bleeds.

      So before you make the jump to transform your Shirley Temple locks into perfectly straight, Kim Kardashian hair, you might want to weigh the risks against the benefits. Be sure to explore other straightening methods that are less chemically invasive and formaldehyde free.

      article found @ http://www.medicaldaily.com/brazilian-blowout-hair-straightening-product-contains-dangerous-levels-cancer-causing-formaldehyde

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        According to the F.D.A., Brazilian Blowouts are extremely hazardous to your health!

        The Brazilian Blowout is very effective for smoothing hair, but it’s nowhere near worth the harmful health effects it has on stylists and clients, but don’t worry, at My Hair Trip Salon we have an organic healthy alternative that will give you the same silky smooth hair as a Brazilian blowout, without causing the severe harm associated with the traditional Brazilian blowout.

        FDA, OSHA Act on Brazilian Blowout

        FDA has received a number of inquiries from consumers and salon professionals concerning the safety of “Brazilian Blowout” and similar “professional use only” hair smoothing products. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Hazard Alert in April 2011 to hair salon owners and workers about potential formaldehyde exposure from working with these products. On August 22, 2011, FDA issued a Warning Letter citing Brazilian Blowout for safety and labeling violations. The following information is intended to answer questions people may have on this subject.
        FDA’s Role in Regulating These Products

        FDA regulates cosmetics, including hair smoothing products, under the authority of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and, if they are marketed on a retail basis to consumers, under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Under these laws, cosmetics do not have to be approved by FDA before going on the market. However, cosmetics must be safe and properly labeled, and companies and individuals who manufacture or market them have a legal responsibility for the safety and labeling of their products and ingredients. FDA can take action against cosmetics on the market that do not comply with the law. To learn more, see FDA Authority Over Cosmetics.

        What This Warning Letter Says About Brazilian Blowout

        FDA issues Warning Letters to notify firms or individuals that they have been found in violation of the laws FDA enforces. A Warning Letter also tells what violations need to be corrected in order to comply with the law.

        The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter cites both safety and labeling violations. For example, the letter lists health risks associated with inhaling formaldehyde and reactions that have been reported when people used the product as directed. Among the reported reactions were eye problems, nervous system problems such as headaches and dizziness, respiratory tract problems, nausea, chest pain, vomiting, and rash. The letter also states that the labeling was misleading because it called the product “formaldehyde free,” even though people were exposed to formaldehyde when using it as intended. The labeling also failed to reveal possible consequences of using this product under the conditions prescribed in the labels or labeling.

        Regulation of Salon Safety

        FDA does not have authority over the operation of salons or the practice of cosmetology.

        Workplace safety in general, including air quality issues, is regulated by OSHA. Salons are also generally subject to state and local authorities, which may specify safety practices such as assuring proper ventilation.

        What OSHA Says About These Products

        During investigations, OSHA found formaldehyde in the air when stylists used hair smoothing products, some of which did not have formaldehyde listed on their labels or in Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) as required by law. During one investigation, air tests showed formaldehyde at levels greater than OSHA’s limits, even though the product tested was labeled as formaldehyde-free. OSHA states that formaldehyde presents a health hazard if workers are exposed. It can irritate the eyes and nose; cause allergic reactions of the skin, eyes, and lungs; and is linked to nose and lung cancer.

        For OSHA’s complete statement, see Hazard Alert: Hair-Smoothing Products That Could Release Formaldehyde.

        Similar Products That Use Formaldehyde-related Ingredients

        The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter should not be interpreted as a broad evaluation of the safety of hair-smoothing products or such ingredients as formaldehyde, methylene glycol, or other formaldehyde-related ingredients. Other hair-smoothing products may vary with respect to composition, intended conditions of use, and other factors. FDA continues to evaluate these products for safety and labeling on a case-by-case basis.

        FDA’s Advice to Consumers

        Skin sensitivity can develop after repeated contact with formaldehyde-related ingredients. When formaldehyde is released into the air it can cause serious irritation of your eyes, nose and lungs. It is recommended that you limit your exposure to products that contain formaldehyde-related ingredients to reduce these health risks.

        Read the label. If you’re purchasing a product on a retail basis, whether at a store or by mail order, including on the Internet, the product is required to have a list of the ingredients. If it doesn’t, please let FDA know. The list of ingredients is required under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Here are some ingredients to look for:

        Formaldehyde
        Formalin
        Methylene glycol
        Ask your salon professional. Products that are marketed only to salon professionals may not have a list of ingredients, because the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act doesn’t apply to them. They are required, however, to have directions for safe use, and OSHA requires them to have an MSDS. You can ask salon professionals if they know whether a product contains formaldehyde-related ingredients or other ingredients you may wish to avoid. In its Hazard Alert on formaldehyde dangers to hair salon owners and workers, OSHA addressed the information companies should provide to salon workers in an MSDS. However, as OSHA also pointed out, the MSDS for Brazilian Blowout did not contain all the required information.
        Report bad reactions. Consumers are one of FDA’s most important sources of information, especially because the law doesn’t require cosmetics to be approved by FDA before they go on the market. To report a reaction to a cosmetic product, use one of these contacts:

        1) Reporting by phone to the Consumer Complaint Coordinator at your nearest FDA district office. Phone numbers are posted on FDA’s Web page, Consumer Complaint Coordinators, and in the Blue Pages of the phone book, generally under United States Government/Health and Human Services.

        2) Reporting online to FDA’s MedWatch adverse event reporting system. You also may call Medwatch at 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form by mail.

        Salon workers also can file complaints about unsafe workplaces with OSHA, as stated in OSHA’s Hazard Alert.

        Where to Learn More

        For information on workplace exposure to formaldehyde, see Formaldehyde on OSHA’s website. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also has published resources on formaldehyde on its website under Formaldehyde: NIOSH Resources.

        FDA will continue to monitor safety issues regarding hair-smoothing products and will report on any new developments.

        October 8, 2010; updated October 18, 2010, May 24, 2011, and October 21, 2011

        Article found at FDA, OSHA Act on Brazilian Blowout

        FDA has received a number of inquiries from consumers and salon professionals concerning the safety of “Brazilian Blowout” and similar “professional use only” hair smoothing products. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Hazard Alert in April 2011 to hair salon owners and workers about potential formaldehyde exposure from working with these products. On August 22, 2011, FDA issued a Warning Letter citing Brazilian Blowout for safety and labeling violations. The following information is intended to answer questions people may have on this subject.
        FDA’s Role in Regulating These Products

        FDA regulates cosmetics, including hair smoothing products, under the authority of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and, if they are marketed on a retail basis to consumers, under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Under these laws, cosmetics do not have to be approved by FDA before going on the market. However, cosmetics must be safe and properly labeled, and companies and individuals who manufacture or market them have a legal responsibility for the safety and labeling of their products and ingredients. FDA can take action against cosmetics on the market that do not comply with the law. To learn more, see FDA Authority Over Cosmetics.

        What This Warning Letter Says About Brazilian Blowout

        FDA issues Warning Letters to notify firms or individuals that they have been found in violation of the laws FDA enforces. A Warning Letter also tells what violations need to be corrected in order to comply with the law.

        The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter cites both safety and labeling violations. For example, the letter lists health risks associated with inhaling formaldehyde and reactions that have been reported when people used the product as directed. Among the reported reactions were eye problems, nervous system problems such as headaches and dizziness, respiratory tract problems, nausea, chest pain, vomiting, and rash. The letter also states that the labeling was misleading because it called the product “formaldehyde free,” even though people were exposed to formaldehyde when using it as intended. The labeling also failed to reveal possible consequences of using this product under the conditions prescribed in the labels or labeling.

        Regulation of Salon Safety

        FDA does not have authority over the operation of salons or the practice of cosmetology.

        Workplace safety in general, including air quality issues, is regulated by OSHA. Salons are also generally subject to state and local authorities, which may specify safety practices such as assuring proper ventilation.

        What OSHA Says About These Products

        During investigations, OSHA found formaldehyde in the air when stylists used hair smoothing products, some of which did not have formaldehyde listed on their labels or in Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) as required by law. During one investigation, air tests showed formaldehyde at levels greater than OSHA’s limits, even though the product tested was labeled as formaldehyde-free. OSHA states that formaldehyde presents a health hazard if workers are exposed. It can irritate the eyes and nose; cause allergic reactions of the skin, eyes, and lungs; and is linked to nose and lung cancer.

        For OSHA’s complete statement, see Hazard Alert: Hair-Smoothing Products That Could Release Formaldehyde.

        Similar Products That Use Formaldehyde-related Ingredients

        The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter should not be interpreted as a broad evaluation of the safety of hair-smoothing products or such ingredients as formaldehyde, methylene glycol, or other formaldehyde-related ingredients. Other hair-smoothing products may vary with respect to composition, intended conditions of use, and other factors. FDA continues to evaluate these products for safety and labeling on a case-by-case basis.

        FDA’s Advice to Consumers

        Skin sensitivity can develop after repeated contact with formaldehyde-related ingredients. When formaldehyde is released into the air it can cause serious irritation of your eyes, nose and lungs. It is recommended that you limit your exposure to products that contain formaldehyde-related ingredients to reduce these health risks.

        Read the label. If you’re purchasing a product on a retail basis, whether at a store or by mail order, including on the Internet, the product is required to have a list of the ingredients. If it doesn’t, please let FDA know. The list of ingredients is required under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Here are some ingredients to look for:

        Formaldehyde
        Formalin
        Methylene glycol
        Ask your salon professional. Products that are marketed only to salon professionals may not have a list of ingredients, because the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act doesn’t apply to them. They are required, however, to have directions for safe use, and OSHA requires them to have an MSDS. You can ask salon professionals if they know whether a product contains formaldehyde-related ingredients or other ingredients you may wish to avoid. In its Hazard Alert on formaldehyde dangers to hair salon owners and workers, OSHA addressed the information companies should provide to salon workers in an MSDS. However, as OSHA also pointed out, the MSDS for Brazilian Blowout did not contain all the required information.
        Report bad reactions. Consumers are one of FDA’s most important sources of information, especially because the law doesn’t require cosmetics to be approved by FDA before they go on the market. To report a reaction to a cosmetic product, use one of these contacts:

        1) Reporting by phone to the Consumer Complaint Coordinator at your nearest FDA district office. Phone numbers are posted on FDA’s Web page, Consumer Complaint Coordinators, and in the Blue Pages of the phone book, generally under United States Government/Health and Human Services.

        2) Reporting online to FDA’s MedWatch adverse event reporting system. You also may call Medwatch at 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form by mail.

        Salon workers also can file complaints about unsafe workplaces with OSHA, as stated in OSHA’s Hazard Alert.

        Where to Learn More

        For information on workplace exposure to formaldehyde, see Formaldehyde on OSHA’s website. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also has published resources on formaldehyde on its website under Formaldehyde: NIOSH Resources.

        FDA will continue to monitor safety issues regarding hair-smoothing products and will report on any new developments.

        article found at http://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/productsingredients/products/ucm228898.htm

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          The Truth About the Brazilian Blowout

          Many of us have heard of – or even tried – the Brazilian blowout. But what exactly is this keratin-based hair-smoothing treatment anyway? And what’s all the hype about? To start, the Brazilian blowout was pioneered in – you guessed it – Brazil. It was developed as a hair-straightening treatment that doesn’t burn the skin or scalp.

          I have naturally curly hair, and it takes a lot of time to keep this mane in check, so I was excited when I found out about the Brazilian blowout. Finally, I could relax my curls and give my hair a beautiful shine. All I needed to do was step out of the shower and let my hair dry on its own. Further, the Brazilian blowout did exactly what it claimed to do – and I would only have to have the treatment every three months.

          But as we know, nothing is perfect. There is a price to pay when getting a Brazilian blowout because the blowout – along with other hair smoothing treatments – contains formaldehyde and chemicals that can cause both acute and long-term health effects.

          Formaldehyde is a chemical that is used as a preservative, an embalming agent and a disinfectant. However, formaldehyde can also modify our hair proteins, called keratins, causing the hair to return to its original, smooth, healthy state. Some of the other chemicals that can cause health issues are methylene glycol, formalin, methylene oxide, paraform, formic aldehyde, methanol, oxomethane, oxymethylene and CAS Number 50-00-0. The chemical methylene glycol is formed when formaldehyde gas is added to water; when heated, this chemical turns back into formaldehyde gas and is then released into the air.

          According to Jarrod Harms, an industry expert and owner of Detour Salon in San Diego California, these chemicals can be harmful at room temperature. “But when they are heated,­ the intensity is increased and can cause harm to both you and your stylist,” says Harms. Some of the acute side effects include nosebleeds, burning eyes and throat, skin irritations and asthma attacks. These chemicals can also lead to long-term health issues, including nasopharyngeal cancer and leukemia.

          Formaldehyde, among these other chemicals, is not illegal, and obviously can be used in cosmetic products. Because of these reported health risks, the FDA has now stated that these blowouts are “misbranded because its label and labeling (including instructions for use) make misleading statements regarding the product’s ingredients and fail to reveal material facts with respect to consequences that may result from the use of the product.” In other words, these blowouts are not illegal. However, they lead us to believe that these products are safe and have no harmful side effects. The problem here is related to disclosure.

          So should you get one or not? Well, think of this blog as a drug commercial. I know you’ve seen them: someone running on the beach, laughing and enjoying life, while the voice tells you how well the drug works. But then the voice quickly spouts off a laundry list of all the side effects. It’s the same thing with these products, except before the FDA stepped in, all you ever heard about were the benefits.

          You can decide whether you want to take a risk by getting a Brazilian blowout. It’s like anything in life: You weigh the risk against the reward. Now, when it comes to the Brazilian blowout, you can base your decision on the facts.

          Article written by Jodi Sawyer, RN

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